• Arnold Schroder

#8: Nature-nurture death spiral pt. 1: Margaret Mead goes to Samoa

Updated: Dec 20, 2020

(07/28/2020) What kind of societies are ultimately possible (i.e. within the range of variation our biology allows)? Why are social movements so prone to division and self-annihilation? These questions may seem unrelated, but both imply a journey into the social sciences of the last century and the ideological conflicts that defined them. This series will examine how different political outlooks are the result of different assessments of human nature, and that far from being academic, an explicit description of human nature is an essential foundation for a political movement.

Bibliography for episode #8:


Felepton, C. Weird Internet Ideas: r/K and the Far-Right. November 4, 2017. https://camestrosfelapton.wordpress.com/2017/11/04/weird-internet-ideas-rk-and-the-far-right/


Freeman, D. (1983) Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth. Cambridge University Press.


Martin, P. S. (2007) Twilight of the Mammoths: Ice Age Extinctions and the Rewilding of America. University of California Press.


Wells, S. (2017) The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey. Princeton University Press.


Xu, Y. & Wang, P. (2012) The frame problem, the relevance problem, and a package solution to both Synthese 187:43–72 DOI 10.1007/s11229-012-0117-8




12 views0 comments